Recognizing domestic violence as a criminal offense: Insights from Bangladesh's 16 days of activism against gender-based violence

Recognizing domestic violence as a criminal offense: Insights from Bangladesh’s 16 days of activism against gender-based violence

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Participants in the open discussion discussed the need to invest in research to address family-level interventions, assess the costs of gender-based violence (GBV) and its impact on national budgets, address patriarchy, and reduce violence against women and girls. Emphasized on.

Gitanjali Singh, Country Representative of UN Women, highlighted, “Annual monitoring and timely amendments of laws are important to keep them relevant. Current global investments are not enough to prevent gender-based violence. Governments should unlock funding from different sectors and adjust the national budget through gender-responsive budgeting.

Christine Blokhus, UNFPA Country Representative, said, “On behalf of UNFPA, I commend the Ministry of Women and Children for their important steps in amending domestic violence laws and introducing new legislation on sexual harassment. You can count on UNFPA’s support in these efforts. As we address violence against women and sexual harassment, working on new laws and improving existing laws, let’s focus these discussions on the dignity, safety and empowerment of women. Sexual harassment is a problematic issue not because it undermines a woman’s dignity – but because it undermines her freedom.

Najma Mubarak, Secretary of the Ministry of Women and Children Affairs, confirmed in her remarks, “We recognize the importance of prioritizing research and development. “Our focus will be on today’s recommendations moving forward.”

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